Yahweh's Restoration Ministry

Q.   You state, “…we accept Yahshua as an Elohim.” Can you explain what you mean by this? As I look at the early church, I find myself having to change my whole thinking. I actually began my quest 7 to 10 years ago with the question of just who is the real Jesus. After growing up in church and marrying a pastor’s daughter and raising 4 children, 2 of which serve as missionaries in New York City, here I am in a spiritual quagmire.

A.  You are not alone in your journey. We have spoken to countless people who have found themselves in the same situation. After following mainstream Christianity for most of their lives, they realize that what they have believed is not scripturally correct. We know this is not an easy transition and commend you for being willing to question your beliefs, as most are unwilling.

The word “elohom” is Hebrew and equivalent to the Greek theos. Below are definitions from the Strong’s Concordance for both words:

elohiym (el-o-heem’); plural of OT:433; gods in the ordinary sense; but specifically used (in the plural thus, especially with the article) of the supreme God; occasionally applied by way of deference to magistrates; and sometimes as a superlative.

theos (theh’-os); of uncertain affinity; a deity, especially (with NT:3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively, a magistrate; by Hebraism, very.

In addition to Strong’s, below is another definition for elohim from the Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew Lexicon:

1) (plural)
a) rulers, judges
b) divine ones
c) angels
d) gods
2) (plural intensive – singular meaning)
a) God, a god, a goddess
b) god-like one
c) works or special possessions of God
d) the one true God
e) God

Based on these sources, both elohim and theos provide for multiple meanings. While it can refer to Yahweh, our Heavenly Father, it can also refer to false gods, angels, and mankind. In short, it refers to any exalted position. Regarding the Messiah, few would debate that He is to be exalted. For this reason, He is counted as an elohim. Also, Thomas in John 20:28 refers to Him as a theos. The notable difference between Elohim (including Theos) and God is how they are perceived within Christianity. Today, God is understood as a reference to a singular deity (or deities as it pertains to the Trinity). However, elohim and theos, from where god is derived, contains a much broader meaning and can refer to anyone in an exalted position.
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Sharon Adams

I understand that the word Elohim is a plural gender in the Hebrew language, correct me if I am wrong. Therefore I don’t understand why Yahshua is accepted as, and I quote, an ‘Elohim’. I would think that in our English we would more likely accept Him as an Eloah or El. But our eternal Father Is Elohim. Creator of all, englobing all. Yahshua being the first is Eloah and everliving Prince. Please explain.

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