the Millennium

Would a Friday Passover place the wavesheaf before the Resurrection?

Q.   According to Sadduces’ method of starting the count, does this mean that when the 14th falls on a Friday, you would observe the wavesheaf before the anniversary of the Messiah’s resurrection (end of 17th)? Also, didn’t Yahshua say to the Sadduces in Mark 12:24 and elsewhere that “you do not understand the Scriptures or the power of Yahweh”?

A.   Yes, in this scenario the wavesheaf would fall on Sunday, a day before the anniversary of Yahshua’s resurrection (accounting for the three days and three nights the Messiah was in the tomb). Interestingly, in this example, the Sadducees and Pharisees would have observed the wavesheaf on the same day. This is due to the fact that the Pharisees began the count on the day after the first High Sabbath, Abib 16, and the Sadducees began the count on the morrow after the weekly Sabbath, Sunday, during the Feast of Unleavened Bread. Therefore, in this specific example, both methods of counting would produce the same results.

Regarding the Sadducees, it’s true that Yahshua reprimanded them in Mark 12:24 for not correctly understanding the resurrection. That being said, He also reprimanded the Pharisees countless times in the New Testament for their man-made traditions and error. Therefore, Yahshua’s reprimands of these Jewish sects are irrelevant as it pertains to His doctrine. Below are a few examples of His displeasure with the Pharisees:

“Then came to Yahshua scribes and Pharisees, which were of Jerusalem, saying, Why do thy disciples transgress the tradition of the elders? for they wash not their hands when they eat bread. But he answered and said unto them, Why do ye also transgress the commandment of Elohim by your tradition?” Matthew 15:1-3.

“But woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men: for ye neither go in yourselves, neither suffer ye them that are entering to go in. Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye devour widows’ houses, and for a pretence make long prayer: therefore ye shall receive the greater judgment. Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye compass sea and land to make one proselyte, and when he is made, ye make him twofold more the child of Gehenna than yourselves,” Matthew 23:13-15.

“And he charged them, saying, Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and of the leaven of Herod,” Mark 8:15.

For additional insight, please visit our Q&A page.  

How does the lights in the firmament determine or “brings about the seasons”?

 

     In your Passover booklet you state: “It is true that the sun divides day from night and brings about the seasons, while the new moon sets the beginning of months.” My question is, how does the lights in the firmament determine or “brings about the seasons”?

     I assume your question is predicated on Genesis 1:14. Based on this single passage, some advocate the use of the equinox to begin the biblical year. They derive this from the reference to the sun and moon. However, it’s crucial to realize that this passage is broad and does not provide any specifics as to how to determine the calendar. For this reason, we must consider additional passages.

Regarding your question, we believe that the sun marks the days, the moon marks the months, and the agriculture (i.e., barley) marks the year. Deuteronomy 16:1 states, “Observe the month of Abib, and keep the passover unto Yahweh thy Elohim….”

The word “observe” comes from the Hebrew shamar. The primary meaning of shamar is to guard, which requires the action of watching. The word “month” derives from the Hebrew chodesh and refers to the new moon. The word “Abib” is Hebrew and literally means, young ears of grain.

Based on the above passage and the Hebrew, it’s evident that we’re to watch for the new moon in the month when the barley is within the Abib stage (i.e., when there is sufficient dough in the ear to roast).

Psalm 104:19 also provides insight is how the sun and moon relates to the seasons: “He appointed the moon for seasons: the sun knoweth his going down.” The word “seasons” is moed and refers to the Feast days. Yahweh confirmed here that the moon, i.e., new moon crescent, is for the seasons. In other words, it’s the crescent that determines the month and therefore the Feast days.

For additional information on the calendar, read our booklet: The Biblical Calendar

I read your article on the Equinox and was wondering why you teach the first biblical month begins with the barley and new moon in light of Genesis 1:14

Equinox     I read your article on the Equinox and was wondering why you teach the first biblical month begins with the barley and new moon in light of Genesis 1:14: “And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for moed, and for days, and years” How do you explain the absence of the “barley” and “new moon” within this passage

 

Equinox     The use of the equinox to begin the biblical year is not scriptural and based on modern Jewish interpretation. Regarding Genesis 1:14, this passage is too broad to form any definitive opinion about the biblical calendar. This includes the barley, equinox, crescent moon, full moon, etc.

For this reason, we do not rely on Genesis 1:14 to support the use of the barley or the new moon crescent in determining the year and subsequent months. Instead, we refer to the entire Word to support these conclusions.

Deuteronomy 16:1 is an example. It states, “Observe the month of Abib, and keep the passover unto Yahweh thy Elohim: for in the month of Abib Yahweh thy Elohim brought thee forth out of Egypt by night.”

There are several key words in this passage. “Observe” comes from the Hebrew shamar, meaning to guard or watch. “Month” comes from the Hebrew chodesh, meaning new moon. And “Abib” is Hebrew and means young ears of grain. Here are a few additional references supporting the meaning of Abib:

“…from an unused root (meaning to be tender); green, i.e. a young ear of grain; hence, the name of the month Abib or Nisan,” Strong’s.

“Month of ear-forming, of greening of crop, of growing green Abib, the month of the Exodus and the Passover (March or April),” Driver & Briggs Hebrew Lexicon.

“…barley that is already ripe, but still soft, the grains of which are eaten either rubbed or roasted,” The Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament.

Based on this, Deuteronomy 16:1 literally reads, “Watch for the new moon of young ears of grain.” Clearly, we see here a connection between the barley and the new moon crescent as it pertains to the first biblical month.

In addition, we also know from the Exodus narrative that the barley was in Abib days before the first biblical crescent. Exodus 9:31 states, “And the flax and the barley was smitten: for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was bolled.” The word “ear” derives from the word Abib. Therefore, it reads, “…and the barley was in the Abib.” From Exodus 9:31 and 12:2, we find that the barley was in Abib just days before the first biblical month.

Scholarship also supports the use of both the new moon crescent and barley. Below are two well accepted sources explaining the use of Abib:

“…Abib is not properly a name of a month, but part of a descriptive phrase, ‘the month of young ears of grain.’ This may indicate the Israelitish way of determining the new year (Ex 12:2), the year beginning with the new moon nearest or next preceding this stage of the growth of the barley,” International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia.

“The months began with the new moon, but the first month was fixed (after the Exodus and by the necessities of the Passover) by the ripening of the earliest grain, namely, barley,” New Unger’s Bible Dictionary.

Consider the following references regarding the new moon:

“The Hebrew or Jewish calendar had three stages of development: the preexilic, or Biblical; the postexilic, or Talmudic; and the post-Talmudic. The first rested on observation merely, the second on observation coupled with calculation, and the third on calculation only. In the first period the priests determined the beginning of each month by the appearance of the new moon,” International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia.

“As the festivals, according to the Mosaic law, were always to be celebrated on the same day of the month, it was necessary to fix the commencement of the month. This was determined by the appearance of the new moon; for the new moon was reckoned not by astronomical calculation, but by actual personal observation. On the thirtieth day of the month watchmen were placed on commanding heights around Jerusalem to watch the sky. As soon as each of them detected the moon he hastened to a house in the city kept for this purpose and was there examined by the president of the Sanhedrin. When the evidence of the appearance was deemed satisfactory, the president stood up and formally announced it, uttering the words, ‘It is consecrated.’ The information was immediately sent throughout the land from the Mount of Olives by beacon fires on the tops of the hills. The religious observance of the day of the new moon may plainly be regarded as the consecration of a natural division of time,” New Unger’s Bible Dictionary.

“…at the time of the new moon, the sun begins to illuminate the moon with a light which is visible to the outward senses, and then she displays her own beauty to the beholders,” The Works of Philo, p. 283. (Note: Philo, who lived between 20 BCE – 50 CE, was a Jewish Hellenistic philosopher who lived in Alexandria, Egypt).

In summary, while we agree that Genesis 1:14 does not directly support the barley or use of the new moon crescent, the same can be said about the equinox or any other method of determining the biblical calendar. This passage is simply too broad to ascertain any specifics. For this reason, a person must consider all the evidence in determining the inner workings of the biblical calendar.

For additional evidence, please see our booklet: The Biblical Calendar.

Also, watch Pastor Randy’s message: Deciphering the Biblical Calendar:

I’m still trying to find in the Bible where it mentions 13 months. Where do you find proof for this?

13th month     I’m still trying to find in the Bible where it mentions 13 months. Where do you find proof for this?

13th month     The Bible never provides an exact number of months for the biblical year. What it does provide is the method to begin the year and count each subsequent month. The Bible confirms that the first month of the biblical year is called “Abib.” Deuteronomy 16:1 states, “Observe the month of Abib, and keep the passover unto Yahweh thy Elohim: for in the month of Abib Yahweh thy Elohim brought thee forth out of Egypt by night.”

The word “observe” comes from the Hebrew shamar and means to guard. It also conveys the idea of watching. The word “month” derives from the Hebrew chodesh. Strong’s defines this word as, new moon and by extension, a month. Lastly, the word “Abib” is Hebrew and means, young ears of grain. Exodus 9:31 verifies that the grain spoken of is barley. It states that the barley was in the “ear” or Abib near the Passover observance (occurring on the 14th day of the first month, Lev. 23:5). Agriculturally, the wheat harvest begins in the third month, approximately two months after the beginning of the barley harvest.

These facts help in determining how to begin the biblical year. Deuteronomy 16:1 is literally commanding that we look for the new moon within the month of green ears. Agriculturally, Abib refers to when the barley enters the late dough stage, i.e., when the grain can be parched or roasted.

Therefore, Abib begins at the new moon crescent when there is barley in the dough stage or later. This occurs between March and April. Each subsequent month then begins with the sighting of the new moon crescent. Since there is an 11-day difference between the solar and lunar year, every 2-3 years a 13th month must be added to keep the seasons aligned. The Jews call this month Adar II. The Bible does not mention a 13th month.

The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary confirms this method, “The months began with the new moon, but the first month was fixed (after the Exodus and by the necessities of the Passover) by the ripening of the earliest grain, namely, barley.”

Additional evidence is found from the International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, “…Abib is not properly a name of a month, but part of a descriptive phrase, ‘the month of young ears of grain.’ This may indicate the Israelitish way of determining the new year (Ex 12:2), the year beginning with the new moon nearest or next preceding this stage of the growth of the barley.”

Since Exodus 9:31 and 12:2 shows that the barley was in Abib before the new moon crescent, this is the pattern YRM uses to fix the month of Abib.

It’s important to note that in the 4th century, Hillel II changed the biblical calendar and transitioned from a calendar based on observation to calculation, including using the conjunction to begin the month and the autumnal equinox to begin the year. Since the autumnal equinox occurs in the fall, corresponding to the 7th Jewish month, the Jews count backwards to mark the first biblical month. Along the way, they also add their postponements, ensuring that days like Yom Kippur does not occur alongside of a weekly Sabbath. To ensure the alignment of the seasons, they also employ a 19-year cycle, adding a 13th month at intervals of 2-3 years.

For more information on the Biblical calander check out our free booklet : The Biblical Calander

Also, watch our video, Deciphering the Biblical Calendar:

How do you use the barley and new moon to determine the biblical year?

     How do you actually measure when the barley is starting to be ready signifying the beginning of the year? Do you need to harvest your own barley? Does this have to be done in Jerusalem? Also, I have been looking at the idea of full moon as ‘New Moon’ and not the first sliver as new moon. Someone who believes new moon means full moon, would point to the difficulty with sighting the first sliver. How do you deal with issues of not being able to see the very first sliver of a crescent? Also, what are your thoughts on the lunar calendar?

 

     As a ministry we’ve been observing the biblical calendar for 19 years. Here is a concise explanation as to why we use the barley to begin the biblical year and new moon crescent to begin the month.

Evidence for the barley can be found in the meaning of the word Abib, the name of the first biblical month, and in biblical scholarship.

We find a reference to the first biblical month in Deuteronomy 16:1. It states, “Observe the month of Abib….” The word “Abib” literally refers to young ears of grain.

“…from an unused root (meaning to be tender); green, i.e. a young ear of grain; hence, the name of the month Abib or Nisan,” Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance.

“Month of ear-forming, of greening of crop, of growing green Abib, the month of the Exodus and the Passover (March or April),” Driver & Briggs Hebrew Lexicon.

“…barley that is already ripe, but still soft, the grains of which are eaten either rubbed or roasted,” The Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament.

“The name of the month, so called because corn [grain] was then forming in the ear, a few weeks before harvest; falling somewhere about March or April; afterwards called Nisan, the first month of the Hebrew year,” Wilson’s Old Testament Word Studies.

Since Abib refers to young grain, i.e., barley, this is what we use to mark the first biblical month. Strictly speaking, Abib describes the stage of barley that is within the dough stage or later. The minimum allowance for Abib was a sheaf used in bundling or about two dry quarts. Also, since the Bible confirms that the barley precedes the new moon crescent (Exodus 9:31 and 12:2), you must have barley that meets the minimum stage of Abib by the new moon crescent. We reject the idea of projecting the barley in anticipation of the wave sheaf offering.

Since Israel observed the barley from the Holy Land and there is a need for one unified year throughout the globe, we observe the barley from Israel. While we do not personally look for the barley, we rely on several independent witnesses who travel and document the barley from Israel.

Scholarship also confirms the use of barley to commence the first biblical month of the biblical year:

“…Abib is not properly a name of a month, but part of a descriptive phrase, ‘the month of young ears of grain.’ This may indicate the Israelitish way of determining the new year (Ex 12:2), the year beginning with the new moon nearest or next preceding this stage of the growth of the barley,” International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia

“The months began with the new moon, but the first month was fixed (after the Exodus and by the necessities of the Passover) by the ripening of the earliest grain, namely, barley,” New Unger’s Bible Dictionary.

Regarding the new moon crescent and full moon, we believe that Scripture and scholarship confirms the new moon.

The word month, as seen in Exodus 12:2 and Deuteronomy 16:1, comes from the Hebrew chodesh and is defined, “…from OT:2318; the new moon; by implication, a month: -month (-ly), new moon.” OT:2318, chadash, is “a primitive root; to be new; causatively, to rebuild.” Strong’s used for both definitions.

In addition to Scripture, evidence for the new moon crescent is also found in antiquity. Philo of Alexandria, c. 20 BCE – c. 50 CE, a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who lived in Alexandria, Egypt, before and during the time of the Messiah, states, “…at the time of the new moon, the sun begins to illuminate the moon with a light which is visible to the outward senses, and then she displays her own beauty to the beholders,” The Works of Philo, p. 283.

Clearly, Philo is describing the first appearance of the new moon crescent and not the full moon.

Scholarship also confirms the new moon crescent:

“The Hebrew or Jewish calendar had three stages of development: the preexilic, or Biblical; the postexilic, or Talmudic; and the post-Talmudic. The first rested on observation merely, the second on observation coupled with calculation, and the third on calculation only. In the first period the priests determined the beginning of each month by the appearance of the new moon,” International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia.

“As the festivals, according to the Mosaic law, were always to be celebrated on the same day of the month, it was necessary to fix the commencement of the month. This was determined by the appearance of the new moon; for the new moon was reckoned not by astronomical calculation, but by actual personal observation. On the thirtieth day of the month watchmen were placed on commanding heights around Jerusalem to watch the sky. As soon as each of them detected the moon he hastened to a house in the city kept for this purpose and was there examined by the president of the Sanhedrin.

“When the evidence of the appearance was deemed satisfactory, the president stood up and formally announced it, uttering the words, ‘It is consecrated.’ The information was immediately sent throughout the land from the Mount of Olives by beacon fires on the tops of the hills. The religious observance of the day of the new moon may plainly be regarded as the consecration of a natural division of time,” New Unger’s Bible Dictionary.

“Originally, the New Moon was not fixed by astronomical calculation, but was solemnly proclaimed after witnesses had testified to the reappearance of the crescent of the moon… By the middle of the fourth century, the sages had established a permanent calendar and the public proclamation of the New Moon was discontinued,” Encyclopaedia Judaica, Vol. 12, p. 1039.

Based on the meaning of the Hebrew chodesh, evidence from early antiquity, and the preponderance of proof from scholarship, Israel clearly used the new moon crescent and not the full moon. As a side note, this would also include the conjunction or dark moon, as this was adopted with Hillel’s changes to the Jewish calendar in the 4th century CE.

Regarding the issue of not seeing the crescent new moon, this has never been a problem for us in the United States. This is mainly due to the size of the nation and ample opportunity to see the crescent. However, if there was an issue, we would likely adopt the method used by the Jews during the time of Messiah. Since the lunar cycle is approximately 29.5 days, they would automatically mark the 30th day in the event that the new moon crescent was not seen by the 30th evening.

As for the lunar Sabbath, this is not scriptural and contradicts the Bible in several points. For instance, the moon was not in place until the fourth day. Also, how does this work with a lunar cycle with a duration of 29.5 days? Every month you have remaining days that you must either observe as additional Sabbaths or ignore. In either instance, how does this fit with the command of working six days and resting the seventh? Also, we’re told to count seven complete Sabbaths from the wavesheaf to Pentecost. This is impossible with the lunar Sabbath doctrine. For additional information, please see our booklet: The Lunar Sabbath Illusion.

For more info on the New Moon please check out our free booklet: What Is a Biblical New Moon
For more info on the Biblical Calendar please check out or free booklet: ABC’s of the Biblical Calendar

What is your take on Hell, Trinity and counting the Omer?

     I would really like to hear your take on hell/lake of fire, trinity, and the counting of the omer as all I want is [Yahweh’s] truth and nothing else, and I would safely assume you are on the same page as me. Am I correct?

 

     The quick answer is that hell is sheol in the Old Testament, hades in the New, and both mean the grave. The lake of fire is what Satan and the incorrigible will be thrown into and destroyed, not live forever in torment. The divine majesty is made up of Father and Son. The Holy Spirit is ruach/pneuma, their divine power likened in Scripture to the wind. The count to the Feast of Weeks is 50 days, beginning during the Feast of Unleavened Bread.

Our Web site has online booklets explaining all of those topics and much more. https://yrm.org/booklets/

Black Moon or New Moon Crescent. What do you say?

    I go by the black moon for the new moon because the month starts with the conjunction. What do you say?

 

    In the scriptural calendar, the conjunction does not begin the month. At the conjunction no moon is visible. Deuteronomy 16:1 in the Hebrew tells us to “watch narrowly for the month (new moon) of green ears [of grain]” (RSB note). How can you watch closely for a new moon that cannot be seen? Often two or even three days of a dark moon precede the appearance of the crescent. Which invisible moon do you declare is the “right new moon”? Yahweh makes finding the first day of the month simple – it falls on the night you first sight a thin lunar crescent. No calculations necessary.

Why do you not use the Jewish calendar in keeping the biblical Feasts instead of relying on the visible new moon?

q    Why don’t you use the Jewish calendar in keeping the biblical Feasts instead of relying on the visible new moon?

aThe present Jewish calendar is not the same calendar the Jews used during the time of the Messiah. Up to the time of the destruction of the second Temple in Jerusalem the Sadduccees were in charge of Temple worship. The growing influence of the Pharisees culminated in their dominating Jewish worship after 70 C.E., when the Jews were driven out of Jerusalem. Modern Jewish worship is an extension of this later influence.

In Temple times visible sightings of the new moon were carried out each month in the environs of Jerusalem. Those who sighted the thin crescent were questioned by the Sanhedrin, which was charged with sanctifying the beginning of the month. When the new moon was seen and verified, a calculated calendar was obviously in use to corroborate the beginning of the 29- or 30-day month.

Certain changes and postponements are incorporated into the present Jewish calendar, established in the year 369 C.E. by Hillel II, which are nowhere found in the Bible. The Bible knows nothing of postponing a Feast day. Yet the present Jewish Calendar has four dehioth (postponements) that are here listed verbatim from The Comprehensive Hebrew Calendar by Arthur Spier:

When the molad [conjunction] of Tishri occurs on a Sunday, Wednesday or Friday, Rosh Hahshanah is post­poned to the following day.

When the Molad Tishri occurs at noon (18h) or later, Rosh Hashanah is postponed to the next day. (Or if this day is a Sunday, Wednesday or Friday, to Monday, Thursday or Sabbath because of Dehiah a.)

When the Molad Tishri of a common year falls on Tuesday, 204 parts after 3 a.m., i.e., 3d 9h 204 p or later, Rosh Hashanah is postponed to Wednesday, and because of Dehiah a., further postponed to Thursday.

When, in a common year succeeding a leap year, the Molad Tishri occurs on Monday morning 589 parts after 9 a.m., 2d 15h 589 p or later, Rosh Hashanah is postponed to the next day.

There is no authorization in the Bible allowing man to transfer or delay a Feast day. Yet, one of the “religious requirements” stated is, “Yom Kippur (Tishri 10) shall not occur on the day before or after the Sabbath and Hoshana Rabba (Tishri 21) shall not occur on a Sabbath.”

Nowhere can we find that Atonement cannot occur on a Friday or Sunday. It may make sense to man’s mind that having a day between the Sabbath and the day of fasting would be desirable, but there is no biblical justification for it. Neither is there any proscription against having Hoshana Rabba occur on the Sabbath.

Interestingly, an enlightening note in The Comprehensive Hebrew Calendar states: “In more that 60 percent of all years Rosh Hashanah does not occur on the day of the Molad [conjunction] but is postponed according to one of the Dehioth. Therefore the Dehioth [postponements] are actually not the exceptions to the rule but the rule.”

In other words, man-made exceptions overrule the rules of the calendar 60 percent of the time. Therefore exceptions govern the modern Jewish calendar. We need to ask, where does the Bible teach such a thing?

Significantly, instead of beginning the annual calendar with Abib, the first biblical month of the year determined by green ears of barley (“Abib” means “green ears”), the Jewish calendar works backward from the Feast of Trumpets and Day of Atonement to set the year.

Spier’s work makes this important acknowledgment: “In the early times of our history the solution was found by the following practical procedure: The beginnings of the months were determined by direct observation of the moon…

“This method of observation and intercalation was in use throughout the period of the second temple (516 B.C.E. — 70 C.E.) and about three centuries after its destruction, as long as there was an independent Sanhedrin. In the fourth century…the patriarch Hillel II…made public the system of calendar calculation which up to then had been a closely guarded secret.”

Thus, the Jews themselves recognize that the calendar that they presently use is of more recent date and is not the calendar Yahshua followed when He walked this earth. The Israelites and Jews of old watched for the appearance of the new moon just as we do today. Observing the new moons has been the practice of Yahweh’s people down through history in obedience to Yahweh’s established heavenly calendar (Gen. 1:14; Ps. 104:19).

I have a question about the new moon report. Why does it say at the last question if the new moon impacts salvation? I know believing in the name of Yahshua certainly does.

q    I have a question about the new moon report. Why does it say at the last question if the new moon impacts salvation? I know believing in the name of Yahshua certainly does.

aYahweh’s directives in the Bible require obedience, which impacts salvation, Hebrews 5:9, including the command to observe the new moons, Psalm 81:3-4, Ezekiel 46:3. We will be judged and rewarded according to our works, 1Cor. 3:10-17, 2Cor. 5:9, Titus 3:8, Rev. 2:23; 3:2-4. The moon sets the beginning of months in the biblical calendar and therefore impacts the right day for observing the annual Feasts, the accuracy of which affects salvation. The Feasts are part of the same law as the Sabbath, Lev. 23. The Scriptures detail the specific dates they are to be observed.

Since Abib is the month of green ears of barley (and starts the count to Passover), are the criteria different for those who live in other parts of the earth where the barley ears will not be green during the same moon?

This earth has different seasons depending on the latitude. While it may be spring in Israel and other areas with the same latitude, it may be fall in southern latitudes of the earth like South America. At the same time it may still be frozen in areas far north, such as Scandinavia and Alaska. The Bible does not make allowances for different climates or have other sets of instructions or different calendars for peoples in different climates. The singular law was to and for Israel. Others may come into the promise under the New Covenant by becoming partakers with Israel, Romans 9 and 11. We find that in the Millennium that the law “shall go forth of Zion, and the word of Yahweh from Jerusalem,” Micah 4:2. If the law is to eminate from the Holy Land, then we must look to the land of Israel for the starting point of our calendar, which is part of Yahweh’s law.

Rest and dwell on Yahweh’s word?

q    I know we are commanded to observe the new moons, but what does that mean for us? Are we supposed to feast and celebrate or rest and dwell on Yahweh’s Word?

a
Nowhere do the Scriptures speak of the regular new moons as Sabbaths. But that doesn’t diminish the necessity to “observe” them, both physically as we look for the thin crescent, and in a spiritual sense. Many prophecies talk about the future Kingdom when the Sabbath as well as the new moons will be observed, Ezekiel 46:1; Isaiah 66:23. Isaiah tells us that people will come before Yahweh to worship on the new moons. This tells us that even though not a rest day, the new moon is a day on which to come before Yahweh in worship, prayer, study, and celebration.