the Millennium

Yahshua vs Yeshua?

Q. Why do you pronounce the savior’s name Yahshua instead of Yeshua?

A. According to the Messiah in John 5:37, He came in His Father’s name. Since biblical scholarship recognizes “Yah” as the short form of Yahweh’s name, the Messiah likely contained this name within His own. This would also explain why so many biblical scholars confirm that the Messiah’s name means, “Yahweh is salvation.” Consider the following:

  • “Jesus Messiah – Greek form of Joshua and of title meaning “Yahweh is Salvation” (Holman Bible Dictionary).
  • “JESUS: …meaning “Yahweh is salvation.” (International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia).

Also,both the Greek Diaglott and Exegesis Bible confirm the pronunciation “Yahshua:”

  • “Jesus, [a savior,] the Son of God, the Messiah, the savior of the world. This name is composed of Yah, or Jah, I shall be and Shua, powerful;-‘I shall be the powerful.” (Diaglott, appendix under Jesus, emphasis added, 1942).
  • “Yah Shua transliterated name {3091 yahshua} {3442, 3443, yashua} [2424 ieesous] Yah Saveth; the name of Mosheh’s successor, the name of the Messiah, and the name of other persons” (ExeGeses Bible, lexicon under Yahshua).

Another indicator for the short form “Yah” within the Messiah’s Name comes from Akkadian cuneiform tablets. Within these tablets are many Jewish names with the prefix “Yah” and “Yahu” dating to 572-477 BCE. Akkadian is a language cognate to Hebrew. Examples of such names include: Yahadil, Yahitu, Yahmuzu, Yahuazar, Yahuazza, and Yahuhin. YRM contacted several professors through email inquiring about these names and received the following responses. Professor Ran Zadok from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem who specializes in Mesopotamian, Iranian and Judaic Studies, confirmed, “It seems to me that the cuneiform spellings render approximately *Ya(h)w.”

Professor Martin Worthington from Cambridge who specializes in Babylonian and Assyrian grammar, Mesopotamian literature, Mesopotamian medicine, Quantitative methods and the study of ancient languages, states, “…scholarly consensus has it that Yahwistic names are well attested in first-millennium Babylonia. There is a strong tendency (though not an absolute rule) for the form to be yahu at the beginning of the name, and yama at the end of the name (though yama is actually yawa, since in this period intervocalic m is usually pronounced w). The cuneiform script does include vowels.  The sign IA is a bit of a special case, since it can represent ia, ii, iu or ie.  But in this case we also have spellings such as ia-a-hu, showing that the vowel is indeed ‘a’.”

The evidence for “Yah” in the prefixes of Jewish names within the Akkadian may suggest a possible shift between “Yah” to “Ye” between the Neo-Babylonian and Achaemenid (572-477 BCE) and the Masoretic (6-10 century CE) periods.

So how did the name “Yeshua” develop? Some theorize that it developed through a linguistic process called dissimilation. The online Oxford Dictionary defines Dissimilation as, “Change (a sound or sounds in a word) to another when the word originally had identical sounds near each other (e.g. in taper, which derives from papyrus, the p is dissimilated to t).”

Another theory that may explain the development of “Yeshua” is a deliberate manipulation of the Hebrew text. It is well documented that the Masoretes (Jewish scribes) suppressed the true Name Yahweh out of a fear of pronouncing the ineffable Name. In Hebrew, Jewish scribes inserted a vowel point, shewa (:) instead of the proper qamets (T), thus changing the sound “ah” in “Yah” to “eh.” The Encyclopedia Judaica further explains, “In the early Middle Ages, when the consonantal text of the Bible was supplied with vowel points to facilitate its correct traditional reading, the vowel points for Adonai with one variation – a sheva (short ‘e’) with the first yod [Y] of YHWH instead of the hataf-patah (short ‘a’) under the aleph of Adonai – was used for YHWH, thus producing the form YeHoWaH. When Christian scholars of Europe first began to study Hebrew they did not understand what this really meant, and they introduced the hybrid name ‘Jehovah’” (vol. 7, p. 680).

To avoid offending the Jews and their proscription against even the short form YAH, this same pattern may have also been used in other names that contained the first half of the theophoric element, including the Name of the Messiah, Yahshua.

 

 

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Posted in Q&A - Messiah's Name.

3
Leave a Reply

avatar
2 Comment threads
1 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
2 Comment authors
daveBradley Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
trackback

[…] The Name of the Messiah is also confirmed from the fact that He came in His Father’s Name, Yahweh (John 5:43). The Name Yahshua means, “Yahweh is Salvation.” Therefore, this is the Name the apostles would have used in the New Testament. For additional information on Yahshua’s Name, see our Q&A: Why do you pronounce the savior’s name Yahshua instead of Yeshua? […]

Bradley
Guest
Bradley

I think it is Yahushua, because Yahshua this would be like Yash WAh, rath then Yash ew waH
Kinda like in japanese Sanosukue sounds like Sano su keH, but is really like Sa nosk KeH

dave
Guest

the real name is yahsua no other name given to the father